Meet the VVC-21 Speakers

The Vacuum Society of Australia (VSA) is pleased to announce our invited and keynote speakers for VVC 21.  Our objective is to showcase talented scientists and invite open discussion, collaboration and debate with the Congress program.  We invite you to read more about our speakers below, and we look forward to you officially meeting them in August.

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Prof. Chennupati 	Jagadish

Prof. Chennupati Jagadish

Head of Semiconductor Optoelectronics and Nanotechnology Group in the Research School of Physics, Australian National University

Biography

Professor Jagadish is a Distinguished Professor and Head of Semiconductor Optoelectronics and Nanotechnology Group in the Research School of Physics, Australian National University. He is currently serving as Past President of IEEE Photonics Society. Prof. Jagadish is the Editor-in-Chief of Applied Physics Reviews (IF:17.05), Editor of 3 book series and serves on editorial boards of 19 other journals. He has published more than 960 research papers (680 journal papers), holds 5 US patents, co-authored a book, co-edited 15 books and edited 12 conference proceedings and 18 special issues of Journals. He is a fellow of 11 Science and Engineering Academies (US, Australia, Europe, India) and 14 Professional Societies (IEEE, MRS, APS…). He received many awards including IEEE Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology, IEEE Photonics Society Engineering Achievement Award, OSA Nick Holonyak Jr Award, IUMRS Somiya Award, UNESCO medal for his contributions to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnologies and Lyle medal from Australian Academy of Science for his contributions to Physics. He has received Australia’s highest civilian honor, AC, Companion of the Order of Australia, for his contributions to physics and engineering, in particular nanotechnology.

Read Chennupati's Abstract

Semiconductor Nanostructures for Optoelectronics, Energy and Neuroscience Applications

Semiconductors have played an important role in the development of information and communications technology, solar cells, solid state lighting. Nanowires are considered as building blocks for the next generation electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will present the results on optoelectronic devices such as lasers/LEDs, THz detectors, energy devices such as solar cells, photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting and Neuro-electrodes. Future prospects of the semiconductor nanowires will be discussed.

Professor Jagadish is a Distinguished Professor and Head of Semiconductor Optoelectronics and Nanotechnology Group in the Research School of Physics, Australian National University. He is currently serving as Past President of IEEE Photonics Society. Prof. Jagadish is the Editor-in-Chief of Applied Physics Reviews (IF:17.05), Editor of 3 book series and serves on editorial boards of 19 other journals. He has published more than 960 research papers (680 journal papers), holds 5 US patents, co-authored a book, co-edited 15 books and edited 12 conference proceedings and 18 special issues of Journals. He is a fellow of 11 Science and Engineering Academies (US, Australia, Europe, India) and 14 Professional Societies (IEEE, MRS, APS…). He received many awards including IEEE Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology, IEEE Photonics Society Engineering Achievement Award, OSA Nick Holonyak Jr Award, IUMRS Somiya Award, UNESCO medal for his contributions to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnologies and Lyle medal from Australian Academy of Science for his contributions to Physics. He has received Australia’s highest civilian honor, AC, Companion of the Order of Australia, for his contributions to physics and engineering, in particular nanotechnology.

A/Prof. Jennifer MacLeod

A/Prof. Jennifer MacLeod

Head of School, School of Chemistry and Physics, Queensland University of Technology

Biography

Jennifer MacLeod has been working in surface science since 1999, when she joined Queen’s University (Kingston, Canada) to help design, build, commission and use an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope. Her research focus at the time was on 1D nanostructures on semiconductors. She went on to join the Institute national de la researche scientifique (INRS) in Varennes, Quebec, where she expanded her research focus to self-assembled molecular architectures. After receiving a Natural Science and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada postdoctoral fellowship, she moved to the Universita degli Studi di Trieste, where she worked on instrumentation development for powder diffraction at Elettra Syncrotron. After returning to INRS for several years, in 2015 she joined QUT as a Senior Research Fellow in Surface Science. She was awarded an Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Early Career Research Award (DECRA) Fellowship in 2017, was promoted to Associate Professor in 2019, and in 2020 became the Head of School for Chemistry and Physics. Her current research interests include studying the chemical, structural, and electronic properties of molecular films, and controlling molecular reactions at surfaces.

Read Jennifer's Abstract

On-surface synthesis of molecular materials

Prof. Jennifer MacLeodHead of School, School of Chemistry and Physics, Faculty of Science – Queensland University of Technology

Bottom-up approaches hold the promise of targeted design of nanomaterials. Using suitably-chosen organic molecular building blocks, we can target the structure and function of the product materials. Constructing these materials on a surface provides further control of the structure: the surface enforces planarity, behaves as an epitaxial template, and can also modify the deposited molecules by acting as a catalyst or by donating adatoms. The variety of available molecular building blocks and surfaces provides access to a near-infinite range of 2D structures.

Here, I will discuss our recent work in using small molecule precursors to synthesize nanomaterials through on-surface reactions. Using surface-catalyzed dehalogenative and decarboxylative reactions, we have investigated the on-surface coupling of a range of small aromatic molecules on transition metal surfaces. Although the organometallic products of these reactions are often beautifully ordered, the covalent products can be quite disordered and unpredictable. We have used a range of techniques (photoemission spectroscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, density functional theory) to performed detailed investigations of the reaction process, providing insight into some of the factors that lead to poor control over covalent products. We have also looked into the role of the halogen byproducts in the dehalogenative approach, and have found a relatively simple way to remove them from the surface.

Using a home-built low-energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (LE-IPES) in combination with ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, we have been able to examine how the electronic properties (HOMO-LUMO gap) evolve during these on-surface reactions, providing insight into structure/function relationships in one- and two-dimensional organic materials.

Prof. Simon Ringer

Prof. Simon Ringer

Director, Core Research Facilities, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, FIEAust, FRSN, FTSE, The University of Sydney

Biography

Professor Simon Ringer is an engineer driving new research in atomic-scale materials design. He uses a materials science and engineering approach to learn how processes such as additive manufacturing can create special atomic structures in metals to deliver remarkable new properties. New ultra-strong lightweight alloys, materials with remarkable electrical conductivity or novel magnetic properties are his interest. Creating new materials via additive manufacturing is important for defence, aerospace, space, energy delivery systems as well as Australia’s traditional extractive industries. He has worked in Sweden, Japan, the USA and Australia, holds patents in the design of materials, has published extensively and is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering. Professor Ringer works as the University of Sydney’s Director of Core Research Facilities where he provides University-wide leadership of major research infrastructure strategy, planning and operations. 

Dr. See Wee Chee

Dr. See Wee Chee

Department of Interface Science - Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society

Biography

See Wee Chee is a group leader in the Department of Interface Science of the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Berlin, Germany). See Wee received his PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Subsequently, he did his postdoctoral work at Arizona State University (USA), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (USA) and the National University of Singapore before joining the FHI in 2019.

His research interest focuses on understanding the dynamical behaviour of functional materials under operating conditions through in situ transmission electron microscopy investigations. Currently, his group at the FHI is taking advantage of the latest advances in electrochemical liquid cell transmission electron microscopy to probe the dynamics of nanoscale electrocatalysts under reactions conditions and to investigate their structure-property relationships using correlated techniques. These studies aim to inspire the design of better catalysts for sustainable chemical energy conversion. More information about his group can be found at https://www.fhi.mpg.de/isc-dept/research-groups/liquid-phase-electron-microscopy.

Prof. Lisa Porter

Prof. Lisa Porter

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University

Biography

Lisa Porter is Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Prof. Porter’s research has covered a broad range of (semi)conducting materials such as transparent conductors (e.g., indium-tin-oxide and Ag nanowire/polymer composites), Group-III nitrides, and the semiconducting polymer polythiophene. Her group currently focuses on gallium oxide and related alloys as a promising new ultra-wide bandgap semiconductor technology for more energy efficient electronics. Some of her awards and honors include AVS Fellow (2021), the N.C. State MSE Alumni Hall of Fame (2018), the Philbrook Prize in Engineering at CMU (2012), a National Science Foundation Career Award (1999-2004) and a National Swedish Foundation Visiting Professorship (2000-2002). Dr. Porter was especially honored to serve as 2018 President of the American Vacuum Society (AVS), a sister society of the Vacuum Society of Australia. Dr. Porter was elected Program Chair for the 2020 and 2021 Electronic Materials Conference, and Conference Chair for EMC 2022 and 2023.

Read Lisa's Abstract

Gallium Oxide as an Emerging Ultra-Wide Bandgap Semiconductor for Future (Opto)Electronics: Advantages and Challenges Associated with Epitaxial Growth and Contacts Development

L.M. Porter,1 L.A.M. Lyle, 1 Y. Yao, 1 K. Das,2 S. Okur,3 G.S. Tompa, 3 K. Jiang, 1 J. Tang, 1 and R.F. Davis1

The intrinsic properties of gallium oxide (Ga2O3) combined with key technical achievements have inspired a surge of R&D efforts to enable a new generation of extreme (opto)electronic devices based on this emerging ultra-wide bandgap semiconductor.  In this presentation Ga2O3’s intrinsic properties and key technical achievements will be discussed in terms of advantages and challenges for future (opto)electronic devices.  With melt-grown single-crystal Ga2O3 substrates commercially available, many efforts are focused on establishing processing routes for epitaxial layers and reliable ohmic and Schottky contacts. In addition, the ability to form Ga2O3-based alloys along with epitaxial films of different Ga2O3 phases, or polymorphs, promises a rich area of research for years to come.

Prof. Michelle Spencer

Prof. Michelle Spencer

Associate Dean, Applied Chemistry & Environmental Science, RMIT University

Biography

Michelle Spencer is Professor and Associate Dean of Applied Chemistry & Environmental Science at RMIT University. She was awarded her PhD from La Trobe University and is a Fellow of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI). She leads the computational materials chemistry group at RMIT, developing new materials and nanomaterials for electronic devices, sensors and battery applications. Michelle has authored more than 100 refereed publications (including articles in Nature Communications and Advanced Materials) and has been awarded multiple university, national and international teaching grants and awards for excellence in HE teaching and digital innovations, including a 2019 AAUT Citation for Excellence in Teaching. She is a Research Associate Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies (FLEET) and has been awarded grants from the Australian Research Council (ARC), the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA), the CSIRO and the Defense Science and Technology Group (DSTG).

Read Michelle's Abstract

Developing 2D Materials for Device Applications

Professor Michelle J.S. SpencerSchool of Science, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, Victoria 3001, Australia

The shape of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials makes them ideally suited to a wide variety of electronic devices. However, at the nanoscale the properties of materials can change and therefore it is imperative to determine how nanostructuring affects their properties and how they can be tuned for different applications. In this talk I will discuss how we are using quantum mechanical methods, and specifically density functional theory calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine the structure and properties of 2D nanomaterials for different technological applications. I will focus on the outcomes of the following projects: the enhanced piezoelectric response of 2D ZnO [1]; tuning the mechanical and chemical properties of monolayer black phosphorus [2]; the gas sensing and electronic properties of silicene [3-5]; and van der Waals heterostructures for multiferroics.

[1] N. Mahmood, H. Khan, K. Tran, P. Kuppe, A. Zavabeti, P. Atkin, M. B. Ghasemian, J. Yang, C. Xu, S.A. Tawfik, M.J.S. Spencer, J. Zhen Ou, K. Khoshmanesh, C.F. McConville, Y. Li, K. Kalantar-Zadeh, “Maximum piezoelectricity in a few unit-cell thick planar ZnO – A liquid metal-based synthesis approach” Materials Today 44 (2021) 69.[2] P.D. Taylor, S.A. Tawfik, M.J.S. Spencer, “Interplay of Mechanical and Chemical Tunability of Phosphorene for Flexible Nanoelectronic Applications”, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C 124 (2020) 24391[3] D.A. Osborne, T. Morishita, S.A. Tawfik, T. Yayama, M.J.S. Spencer, “Adsorption of Toxic Gases on Silicene/Ag(111)”, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 21 (2019) 17521[4] P.D. Taylor, D.A. Osborne, S.A. Tawfik, T. Morishita, M.J.S. Spencer, “Tuning the work function of the silicene/4 x 4 Ag(111) surface”, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 21 (2019) 7165[5] R. Yaokawa, T. Ohsuna, T. Morishita, Y. Hayasaka, M.J.S. Spencer, H. Nakano, “Monolayer-to-bilayer transformation of silicenes and their structural analysis” Nature Communications 7 (2016) 10657

Prof. Karen Livesey

Prof. Karen Livesey

Senior Lecturer School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle

Biography

Karen Livesey is a theoretical condensed matter physicist, specializing in magnetic nanomaterials. Her research focusses on useful applications of magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic thin films. She completed BSc and PhD degrees at the University of Western Australia (UWA) and postdoctoral training at CSIRO and at the University of Colorado – Colorado Springs (UCCS), before joining UCCS as an Assistant Professor of Physics in 2012. In 2018, she was promoted to Associate Professor of Physics with tenure. In 2020, Karen relocated to the University of Newcastle, Australia, during a global pandemic.

Karen has won awards for her teaching, research, talks, and service. She has attained research funding from the US National Science Foundation, the UK Royal Society, and the Perimeter Institute in Canada. In 2018-19 she was one of 8 women in the world chosen as an Emmy Noether fellow of the Perimeter Institute. She has given 9 invited talks at international conferences and 19 invited seminars at departments on three continents. Karen has taught Physics at every level from first-year through to PhD classes, winning awards for the clarity of her presentations.

Prof. Hiroshi Daimon

Prof. Hiroshi Daimon

Fellow, Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute

Biography

Dr. Hiroshi Daimon is a Fellow of Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute. He was born in 1953 in Utsunomiya, Japan. He graduated from the University of Tokyo in 1976 and received his Ph.D. in 1983. He worked at the Institute for Solid State Physics, the University of Tokyo as an educational staff (1978 – 1983), at the School of Science, the University of Tokyo as an assistant professor (1983 – 1990), at the School of Engineering Science, Osaka University as an associate professor (1990 – 1997), at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) as a professor (1997 – 2019). He stayed at Advanced Light Source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA (1994 – 1995).

He pioneered the new field of two-dimensional photoelectron spectroscopy with his invention of the two-dimensional photoelectron spectrometer DIANA. He succeeded to view atomic orbitals using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation, and also realized to take stereoscopic photographs of atomic arrangements viewed from a specific atom using circularly polarized synchrotron radiation. These technologies have received numerous awards, including the Surface Science Society Japan Award (2010), The Commendation for Science and Technology (the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan, 2008), the Ichimura Prize in Technology-Meritorious Achievement Prize (2002), etc. He was President of the Surface Science Society of Japan in 2017, and President of the Vacuum and Surface Science Society of Japan in 2018.

 

Prof. Christine Charles

Prof. Christine Charles

Head of the Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Australian National University

Biography

Christine Charles is Professor and Head of the Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion laboratory at the Australian National University. She works on experimental expanding plasmas applied to space science and space propulsion. She is the inventor of the Helicon Double Layer Thruster, a plasma thruster for space use, which lead to the development of the WOMBAT XL space simulation chamber at ANU and the development of the Pocket Rocket electrothermal plasma thruster tailored for nano-satellites. She was awarded the 2015 Women in Industry Excellence in Engineering and her research output has been recognised by her Fellowship of the American Physical Society in 2013 and her Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Science in 2015.

Read Christine's Abstract

Space Plasma Thrusters: from concepts to prototype testing in vacuum

C. Charles, D. Tsifakis, R. BoswellSpace Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory (SP3), Research School of Physics, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia

The Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion laboratory’s research focuses on space plasmas (solar corona and exoplanet research) and space missions (mission to mercury) in collaboration with many overseas partners. Our interest is the development of advanced concepts and technologies which ranges from space thrusters (low earth orbit, geostationary and deep space) to focused ion beams (materials characterisation, forensic studies) since both share similar technologies. Over the past decade the development of a range of electrodeless plasma thrusters based on geometric and magnetic plasma expansion (i.e. Helicon thruster, Pocket Rocket thruster, Naphtalene thruster) has provided a wonderful platform for a better understanding of basic plasma physics. Vacuum technologies are essential in the development and testing of space thrusters, thruster diagnostics, thruster sub-systems and thruster integration within satellite platforms. Our laboratory on the main ANU campus (Research School of Physics) has a full suite of custom-made vacuum testing facilities.

Prof. Catherine Stampfl

Prof. Catherine Stampfl

Professor, School of Physics at The University of Sydney

Biography

Catherine Stampfl FAA FRSN is a Professor in the School of Physics at The University of Sydney since 2003, and recipient of an ARC Federation Fellow. From 1990 to 1998 she worked at the Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max-Planck Society, Berlin, Germany, with a year in 1997 working in the Electronic Materials Laboratory at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, California USA. From 1999 she worked in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston Chicago, USA as a Senior Research Associate, until 2002, and concurrently lectured at the Technical University in Berlin, receiving her Habilitation from the Technical University of Berlin in 2006. Her research field is theoretical and computational condensed matter physics where she uses first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to gain fundamental understanding into the behaviour of solids, their surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures, to predict new and improved materials for future technological applications. She is the author of over two hundred and thirty publications.

Read Catherine's Abstract

Turning Carbon Dioxide into a Carbon source: Nano-Catalysts for Sustainable Chemicals and Fuels from Theory and Computation

C. StampflSchool of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006, AustraliaThe University of Sydney Nano Institute, Australia

The ever increasing consumption of the world’s fossil-fuel resources due to the rapid development of industry, demands the exploration of alternative renewable resources. This, added to globally increasing pressure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, has led to considerable efforts in developing CO2 as a carbon source for the sustainable chemical production of hydrocarbon fuels, with a zero or even negative cost due to CO2’s practically unlimited availability. Central to further advancement in the creation of renewable and benign energy sources and environmental protection, is the breakthrough developments of new nano-catalysts. But more than just cost and catalytic activity need to be addressed in order to bridge the gap between the lab and widespread utilization; selectivity, reusability, and stability are all also required attributes of the catalysts. Aiming to contribute to solutions to this challenge, we have performed electronic structure calculations, in synergy with experiment, for several classes of nano-catalyst. These include the dry reforming of methane with carbon dioxide over nickel based composite catalysts for syngas production (carbon monoxide and hydrogen)1, conversion of methane and carbon dioxide to the higher value product chemical acetic acid over metal-exchanged zeolites2, carbon dioxide reduction over novel doped two-dimensional nitride catalysts and molecular cobalt porphyrinbased catalysts. These studies highlight the role of the catalyst-support interface and dopant species and how they can be used to design improved catalysts. The calculations also reveal the relationship between structure, charge and spin-states in the porphyrin-based catalysts and how their interplay unveils the mechanism for the hitherto not understood destruction of this electrocatalyst3.

1 Ping Wu, Yongwen Tao, Huajuan Ling, Zibin Chen, Jia Ding, Xin Zeng, Xiaozhou Liao, Catherine Stampfl, Jun Huang, Cooperation of Ni and CaO at Interface for CO2 Reforming of CH4: A Combined Theoretical and Experimental Study, ACS Catalysis 9, 10060 (2019).2 Peng Zhang, Xuejing Yang, Xiuli Hou, Jianli Mi, Zhizhong Yuan, Jun Huang, Catherine Stampfl, Active sites and mechanism of the direct conversion of methane and carbon dioxide to acetic acid over the zincmodified H-ZSM-5 zeolite, Catalysis Science & Technology 9, 6297 (2019).3 Xuejing Yang, Xuejian Xu, Xiuli Hou, Peng Zhang, Jianli Mi, Beibei Xiao, Jun Huang, Catherine Stampfl, Transition metal-doped tetra-MoN2 monolayers as an electrochemical catalyst for CO2 reduction: A density functional theory study, Catalyst Communications 149, 106212 (2021).4 Aleksei N Marianov, Alena S Kochubei, Tanglaw Roman, Oliver J Conquest, Catherine Stampfl, Yijiao Jiang, Resolving Deactivation Pathways of Co Porphyrin-Based Electrocatalysts for CO2 Reduction in Aqueous Medium, ACS Catalysis 11, 3715 (2021).

Dr. Marcelo Juni-Ferreira

Dr. Marcelo Juni-Ferreira

European Spallation Source

Biography

Marcelo Juni Ferreira is the Group leader of the European Spallation Source Vacuum System, responsible for all technical vacuum for the facility, what includes the 2GeV SRF proton accelerator, a high vacuum target monolith and all the vacuum system for neutron instruments. He received a B.S. in Physics, M.Sc. in Materials and Fabrication Process Engineering (both from State University of Campinas, Brazil) and Ph.D. in Material Science Engineering (Federal University of Sao Carlos, Brazil). He was the head of Vacuum Group at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) for the UVX machine during the early design, construction (in house) and operation phases, what included insertion devices vacuum system and beam lines vacuum systems. He left the laboratory as a member of the Direction board of CNPEM (organization responsible to operate the LNLS) to join the NSLS-II/BNL project during the design and fabrication phases for the synchrotron accelerator. After that, he became the head of the Vacuum Science and Engineering Department at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, working on surface science for RF guns, supporting the vacuum needs for the facility and the design/simulations of the LCLS-II vacuum system. His research interests are in surfaces science, thin films, fabrication processes for ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and extreme high vacuum (EHV), vacuum instrumentations (calibration) and non-evaporable coatings, mainly in the applications of photon-desorption and electron-desorption in materials characterization for particles accelerators and beam lines applications. Member of the Brazilian and Swedish vacuum societies, Vacuum Integration Working Group Leader IFMIF/DONES (EUROfusion), chair of the Vacuum Technology division at IUVSTA, representative of IUVSTA for TC112/ISO and member of the editorial board of EPJ Techniques and Instrumentation.

Prof. Francesca Iacopi

Prof. Francesca Iacopi

Chief Investigator of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Transformative Meta-Optical Systems

Biography

Francesca Iacopi received her MSc in Physics from Roma La Sapienza University, Italy (1996), PhD in E.E./Materials Science from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium (2004), and she is currently Professor of Nanoelectronics, in the Faculty of Engineering and IT of the University of Technology Sydney, and Chief Investigator of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Transformative Meta-Optical Systems (TMOS).

Iacopi has over 20 years’ R&D experience in semiconductor Industry and Academia. Her research focus is the translation of basic scientific advances in nanomaterials and novel device concepts into industrial processes. Her seminal work at IMEC on low-k dielectrics for on-chip interconnects over the 1999-2009 decade has informed the industrial uptake of porous dielectrics into modern semiconductor microprocessors. More recently, she invented a process to harness the properties of graphene on silicon for integrated micro-technologies. Major awards include a Gold Graduate Student Award from the Materials Research Society (2003), a Future Fellowship from the Australian Research Council (2012-2016), a Global Innovation Award (2014) and was listed among the 30 most innovative Australian engineers in 2018. Prof. Iacopi is a Fellow of the Institute of Engineers Australia, serves in the Board of Governors of IEEE EDS (2021-23), as well as in various standing committees for IEEE and the Materials Research Society.

Read Francesca's Abstract

Epitaxial Graphene on Silicon Wafers and its Broad-Ranging Integrated Applications

Francesca Iacopi, University of Technology Sydney

Graphene has been heralded for years as a material with a variety of exceptional functionalities and anticipated benefits in areas from electronics, optics/photonics, to communications, energy and biocompatible applications. Particularly, its atomic -thin nature makes it very appealing for integrated technologies. Also, the capability for dynamically tuning its charge transport properties on-demand within a device, offers a level of versatility unavailable so far with more conventional thin -films.

Therefore, graphene technologies hold vast promise as a complement to current silicon technologies. However, despite this interest, the introduction of graphene into semiconductor technologies is not a trivial endeavour. We will review some of the specific challenges that graphene has encountered regarding the feasibility of semiconductor applications, starting from the need for direct, consistent and up-scalable synthesis and the need to ensure reliability aspects.

We will then review our unique approach to obtain epitaxial graphene on silicon substrates over large areas and in a site – selective fashion. This process is based on the use of a solid-state source of carbon – silicon carbide on silicon – combined with a liquid-phase-epitaxy growth of graphene using a catalytic alloy of nickel and copper. This technology has allowed us to reveal for the first time the electronic transport properties of epitaxial graphene on 3C-SiC on silicon over large scales, with a sheet resistance comparable as that of the more conventional epi graphene. In addition, it allowed us to demonstrate how the control of the graphene interfaces can be a more important factor than achieving large grain sizes. In fact, we suggest that, depending on the chosen application, well- engineered defects in graphene are key to achieving the wanted performance.Finally, we will share the recent progress of this technology for integrated More than Moore applications.

Prof. Yongmin Kim

Prof. Yongmin Kim

Professor Department of Physics, Dankook University

Biography

Read Yongmin's Abstract

Optical Transitions of Polarons with Rashba Effect in Methylammonium Lead Tri-halide Perovskites under High Magnetic Fields

We investigate photoluminescence (PL) transitions of MAPbX3 (X = I, Br and Cl) organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite single crystals under magnetic fields of up to 60 T. In these materials, sharp free-exciton transition peaks emerge at a low temperature (4.2 K). Under strong magnetic fields, the free-exciton PL transitions of three different halogens show dramatic differences. The free-exciton transitions of the MAPbCl3 crystal undergo negative energy shifts, while those of the MAPbBr3 crystal show normal diamagnetic shifts. To obtain the variation from Cl to Br, we attempt to measure PL transitions of MAPbClxBr3-x. For MAPbI3, the transition-energy shifts for both + and - transitions at 4.2 K exhibit a power-law dependence on the magnetic field. Such inconsistent magnetic-field effects on different halogens make it difficult to understand the transition-energy behavior through a unified model. We propose a possible mechanism for the field effects that is based on a combination of the Rashba effect induced by strong spin-orbit coupling and the polaron effect caused by the polar nature of the inorganic elements.

Prof. Marcela Bilek

Prof. Marcela Bilek

Professor of Applied Physics and Surface Engineering, University of Sydney

Biography

Marcela Bilek is Professor of Applied Physics and Surface Engineering at the University of Sydney. Her research is encompasses both fundamental science and practical applications in materials physics and engineering, plasma deposition and processing, thin film materials, and cross-disciplinary research in the areas of biointerfaces and medicine. She pioneered plasma immersion ion implantation processes to activate surfaces for reagent-free, spontaneous covalent immobilisation of functional bioactive molecules. She holds a B.Sc. (Hons I) from the University of Sydney and a PhD from the University of Cambridge, UK. She has published over 300 peer-reviewed journal articles, 1 (now in its second edition) book, 6 book chapters and 13 patents. She has trained 33 PhD students, mentored 25 post-doctoral fellows and early career researchers. Honours and prizes include the Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist of the Year (2002); ARC Federation Fellowship (2003); Australian Academy of Science Pawsey Medal (2004); Australian Innovation Challenge Award (2011); ARC Future Fellowship (2012); the inaugural Plasma Surface Engineering Leading Scientist Award (2018) and an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellowship (2019-2024). She was elected to the Fellowships of the American Physical Society (APS), the American Vacuum Society (AVS) the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in recognition of her work on plasma processes for materials modification and synthesis.

Read Marcela's Abstract

Plasma surface engineering for bio-functionalisable surfaces and nanoparticles: Fundamentals and applications

 MMM Bilek*1,2,3,4, C.T. Tran1,2, LJ Martin1, A. Gilmour1,2, B Akhavan1,2, L Haidar1,2, R. Walia1,2, WJ Gan3, P Thorn3, G Yeo3, S Fraser2

1School of Physics, A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia2School of Biomedical Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia3Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia4 Sydney Nano Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia5Heart Research Institute, Sydney, NSW 2042, Australia

Bio-functionalized surfaces are of great interest for a wide range of applications, particularly in biomedical diagnostics and implantable medical devices. We have shown that radicals embedded in polymeric surfaces facilitate simple, one-step surface-functionalisation [1]. The radicals are created by energetic ion bombardment of the surfaces. Covalent immobilisation of functional molecules is achieved by immersion or spotting / painting of the biomolecule-containing solutions onto the activated surfaces. This strategy simplifies covalent functionalisation of surfaces enormously, eliminating the need for wet-chemistry and the associated solvent disposal and yield problems. This approach has been used to immobilise bioactive peptides, antibodies, enzymes, single stranded DNA, and extra-cellular matrix proteins [2] onto many materials, including polymers, metals and ceramics.

This presentation will expound the fundamental science underpinning these new approaches. Process adaptions that extend the application of these techniques to functionalisation of the internal surfaces of complex, porous materials and structures will be explored. New applications enabling biological studies of the response of individual cells to proteins on a sub-cellular scale [3], and the preparation of multi-functionalisable nanoparticles [4] will be elucidated.

Finally, we will show that spontaneous covalent immobilisation enabled by surface embedded radicals allows the polymerisation of covalently linked hydrogels onto the surface [5] and the control of the density and orientation of surface-immobilised bioactive peptides [6]. This is achieved by tuning electric fields in the double layer at the surface during the immobilization through pH variations and/or the application of external electric fields as delivered by a simple battery.

[1] PNAS  108:14405-14410  (2011);[2] Appl. Surf Sci 310:3-10 (2014);[3] ACS Appl. Mater. and Interfaces (2018);[4] ACS Appl. Nano Materials (2018);[5] Adv. Funct. Materials (2020);[6] Nat. Comm. 9:357 (2018)

 

Prof. Magdaleno R. Vasquez Jr.

Prof. Magdaleno R. Vasquez Jr.

Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Materials Engineering (DMMME), University of the Philippines

Biography

Magdaleno R. Vasquez Jr. is a faculty of the Department of Mining, Metallurgical, and Materials Engineering (DMMME) at the University of the Philippines in Diliman (UPD). He earned his BS Chemical Engineering and MS Materials Science and Engineering degrees from UPD and his Doctor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering from Doshisha University. His research interests include plasma science, ion sources, and charged particle-material interactions. His current focus is the development of affordable plasma and ion source systems for material synthesis and modification especially those with practical and industrial relevance. He established the Plasma-Material Interactions Laboratory at DMMME where he implements government-funded research projects and mentors students. Currently, he is the Director of the Technology Transfer and Business Development Office of UPD. He was the former Chairperson of DMMME, past President of the Vacuum Society of the Philippines, past Councilor of the International Union of Vacuum Science, Technique, and Applications, and delegate to the Asian African Association for Plasma Training. In 2018, he was conferred the title Scientist by the university. In 2019, he was appointed as a University Innovation Fellow.

Read Magdaleno's Abstract

Production of broad-area low-energy ion beams

Ion beam-based processes are routinely used in the synthesis and modification of materials. However, as surface features become more complex especially in the nanometer scale, precise control over the surface properties and responses becomes critical. One way to achieve this is by tuning the energy of the incident ion interacting on the surface. Hence, the development of a low-energy ion source system was conceived. Ion beams with narrow energy distribution and having a broad area cross-section can be used for thin film deposition, shallow junction formation, and surface modification. In this talk, the design of a multi-cusp ion source system is discussed. Ions from a quiescent plasma reservoir were accelerated using a two-electrode extractor configuration with a 4 cm diameter. Monoenergetic ion beams in the range of 100 eV were produced using the highly transparent extraction electrodes. Custom-built diagnostic tools were used to characterize the plasma and the extracted ion beam. Space-charge effects of the positive ions were mitigated by primary electrons from the source. To demonstrate its applicability, the system was used to grow thin films such as diamond-like carbon.

Prof. Rob Lamb

Prof. Rob Lamb

Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Light Source Inc

Biography

Prof. Robert Lamb is the Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Light Source Inc. Canada’s national synchrotron lightsource facility. He was previously the Foundation Executive Director of the Australian Synchrotron.

Prof. Lamb was educated at Melbourne and Cambridge Universities and subsequently held academic appointments in England, Germany, the United States, Canada, Hong Kong and Australia. The latter most recently as Professor of Chemistry at the University of Melbourne. His research is in the area of surface science and coatings technology. Utilising a range of vacuum analytical tools and notably X ray absorption and scattering techniques. Research focus in recent years has been in the way surfaces interact with the natural environment and in particular understanding the mechanisms underpinning non stick interfaces that result in ultrawaterproofing and marine antifouling.

He is also interested in the connection that leads government funded research into private sectors relationships effectively translating science into technology. He has been principal in the creation of 5 companies, most recently in Hong Kong/China and Canada. The latest manufacturing key medical isotopes using light rather than the conventional nuclear reactor approach and thus representing a significant environmental advancement (see http://isotopeinnovations.com/about/)

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Synchrotron Lightsources – see more for less?

The Canadian Lightsource (CLS) is a 3rd generation synchrotron lightsource supporting 22 beamlines focussed on spectroscopy, scattering, diffraction and imaging. It is typical of a group of 3rd generation facilities including UK (Diamond), Australia (AS), France (Soleil), Switzerland (SLS), Spain (Alba) and Thailand (Siam Photon Source). All of which began operations in the first decade of the new century.

This talk will look at the evolution of the CLS through scientific highlights in agriculture, health, advanced materials and the production of medical isotopes. It will also look at the instrumentation which typifies such large scale big science facilities and current preparations for transitioning the CLS to 4th generation synchrotron technology. Over half of the current 3rd gen facilities are currently planning/undergoing such upgrades with a price tag of up to $1 billion per facility. The scientific rationale for such an investment will be examined.

Three 4th generation facilities are now in operation producing an even brighter and more coherent source of light. The early scientific outcomes are extremely encouraging.

Prof. Ray-Hua Horng

Prof. Ray-Hua Horng

Professor Institute of Electronics, National Chiao Tung University

Biography

Ray-Hua Horng received the B.S., and Ph.D. degrees from National Cheng Kung University and National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan, respectively, all in electrical engineering. She has worked in the field of III–V compound materials by MOCVD as an Associate Researcher with Telecommunication Laboratories, Chunghwa Telecom Co. Ltd., Taoyuan, Taiwan. She is currently Distinguished Professor with the Institute of Electronics, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University. She has authored or coauthored over 300 technical papers and holds over 100 patents in her fields of expertise. Her main interests are solid-state lighting devices, III–V solar cells, optoelectronic devices, high power devices, and gas sensors.

Dr. Horng received numerous awards recognizing her work on high-brightness LEDs. She has been awarded by the Ministry of Education of Taiwan for Industry/ University Corporation Project in 2002, by the Ministry of Science & Technology of Taiwan for the excellent technology transfer of high-power LEDs in 2006, 2008,2009, 2010 and 2011 by Chi Mei Optoelectronics for the first prize of Chi Mei Award in 2008, by the 2007 IEEE Region 10 Academia-Industry Partnership Award and distinguish research award of National Science Council of Taiwan in 2013. She became the Fellow of the Australian Institute of Energy since 2012, Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology since 2013, Fellow of SPIE since 2014, Fellow of IEEE since 2015, Fellow of OSA since 2016, Fellow of IOP since 2020.

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Development of microLED light source for wearable system applications

The talk is to introduce the developing of microLED light source for wearable devices applied to home care, adding innovative features such as physical health, physiological information. First, how to successfully develop a small-size and very thin LED, and bonded it to a flexible substrate will be described. After the testing has a good photoelectric properties and light stability. Then, successfully developed a ragged quantum dot light source to enhance the brightness of green light to meet the conditions of an ideal wearable sensing light source, and successfully satisfy the measurement requirement. Finally, we use the light source and self-powered system to successfully build and analyze the wearable system’s blood oxygen test.

Prof. Feng Wang

Prof. Feng Wang

Professor of Chemistry at Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Science, Computing and Engineering Technologies at Swinburne University of Technology

Biography

Feng Wang is Professor of Chemistry at Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Science, Computing and Engineering Technologies at Swinburne University of Technology (SUT). Feng received her PhD degree in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry at the University of Newcastle (NSW, 1994). She was a recipient of NSERC Canada International Postdoctoral Fellowship Award at University of Waterloo (1994-1996). Feng relocated to School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne (1996-2000) as a Research Fellow. After a short period at VPAC as a software engineer, she joined SUT in 2003. As a teaching and research academic staff, Feng teaches undergraduate students at all year levels and supervises postgraduate research projects. She also mentors early career researchers and served as Deputy Chair of the Department and Head of Chemistry (2016-2018). Feng’s research features strong link and collaboration with experiment including Synchrotron sourced spectroscopy (e.g., Australian Synchrotron and Elettra). She leads many theory-driven discoveries in a broad spectrum of applications in medicinal, biophysical, solar energy, material chemistry and molecular physics with nearly 200 peer reviewed articles. She has served many expert panels for research proposal assessment for international research funding agencies including Ireland, Portugal, Canada, Romania and Czech. She is an ARC College of Expert and Deputy Chair of the National Computational Merit Allocation Committee.

Read Feng's Abstract

Computational spectroscopy led chemical discoveries

 

This presentation dedicates to J.K.G. Watson, who passed away on December 17, 2020, for his achievement and contribution in modern molecular spectroscopy.

Physical properties of almost all materials should be predictable, in principle, by solving the quantummechanical equations governing their constituent electrons. Computational chemistry and spectroscopy are turning into digital chemistry — a synergistic assembly of quantum mechanical calculation, simulation, machine learning (ML) and optimization strategies for describing, solving and predicting chemical information. It allows us to understand the chemical phenomena and materials properties through information coded in the structures.

Computational spectroscopy has been essential in molecular spectroscopy for measurements. This invited keynote presentation will cover a broach spectrum of computational spectroscopy driven discoveries in recent years at Swinburne University with close collaboration with experiments. In particular, I will highlight through the narrative of collaboration leading to breakthrough of the structure of organometallic compound ferrocene using IR spectroscopy [1-3], a combined computational and XPS measurement of dipeptide [4], theory guided conformation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) [5-6]; robust optical reporting of small molecular anticancer drugs with quinazoline scaffold (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors) [7-8], and computational NMR study for geometric isomers of resveratrol [9], as well as recent applications of machine learning for the design of organic dye sensitized solar cells [10-11]

References

  • 1. F. Wang and V. Vasilyev, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 120, 2020, 1.
  • 2. S. P. Best, F. Wang, M. T. Islam, S. Islam, D. Appadoo, R. M. Trevorah, C. T. Chantler, Chemistry—An European Journal, 22, 2016, 18019 – 18026.
  • 3. N. Mohammadi, A. Ganesan, C. T. Chantler and F. Wang, Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, 713, 2012, 51-59.
  • 4. A. P. Wickrama Arachchilage, F. Wang, V. Feyer, O. Plekan, and K. C. Prince, Journal of Chemical Physics, 136, 2012, 124301 (8 pages).
  • 5. T. C. Yang, G. L. Su, C. G. Ning, J. K. Deng, F. Wang, S. F. Zhang, X. G. Ren, Y. R. Huang, Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 111, 2007, 4927-4933.
  • 6. P. Duffy, J. A. Sordo and F. Wang, Journal of Chemical Physics, 128, 2008,125102.
  • 7. M. Khattab, S. Chatterjee, A. H. A. Clayton and F.Wang, New Journal of Chemistry 40, 2016, 8296—8304.
  • 8. Md L. Kabir, F. Wang and A. H.A. Clayton, International Journal of Molecular Science, 22, 2021, 2582.
  • 9. F. Wang and S. Chatterjee, Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 121, 2017, 4745-4755.
  • 10. F. Wang, S. Langford and H. Nakai, Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling, 102(2021)107798
  • 11. Q. Arooj and F. Wang, Solar Energy. 188, 2019, 1189-1200.

Prof. Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh

Prof. Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh

Chief Investigator of the ARC Centre of Excellence FLEET & Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow 2018

Biography

Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh is a professor of Chemical Engineering at UNSW and one of the Australian Research Council Laureate Fellows of 2018. He is also the director of the Centre for Advanced Solid and Liquid based Electronics and Optics (CASLEO), at UNSW and a chief investigator of the ARC Centre of Excellence of Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies (FLEET). Prof. Kalantar-Zadeh is involved in research in the fields of electronics, materials sciences and sensors, and has co-authored of >450 scientific papers and books. He is also a member of the editorial boards of journals including ACS Applied Nano Materials (associate editor), ACS Sensors, Advanced Materials Technologies, Nanoscale, Applied Materials Today, Applied Surface Science and ACS Nano. Kalantar-Zadeh is best known for his works on two-dimensional semiconductors, ingestible sensors and liquid metals. He led his group to the invention of an ingestible chemical sensor: human gas sensing capsule (now called Atmo capsule). He has received many international awards including the 2017 IEEE Sensor Council Achievement, 2018 ACS Advances in Measurement Science Lectureship awards and 2020 Robert Boyle Prize of RSC. He also appeared in the Clarivate Analytics most highly cited list since 2018.

Read Kourosh's Abstract

Magical surface patterns of transition metals

During the liquid-to-solid phase transition of alloys, elements segregate in the bulk phase and microstructures are formed. In contrast, we show here that in Ga alloy systems with other metals, highly ordered nanopatterns, such as Turing patterns, emerge preferentially at the alloy surfaces during solidification. These patterns depend of the ambient conditions such as temperature and gaseous content. We present a variety of transition, hybrid and crystal-defect-like patterns, in addition to lamellar and rod-like structures in such surface configurations. Combining experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the influence of the superficial added elements during surface solidification and elucidated the pattern-formation mechanisms, which involve surface-catalysed heterogeneous nucleation. We further demonstrated the dynamic nature the phenomenon under different solidification conditions and for various alloy systems and degenerate conditions.

Prof. Kirrily Rule

Prof. Kirrily Rule

Instrument Scientist, ANSTO

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Biography

Kirrily Rule is a neutron scattering instrument scientist at ANSTO, operating the thermal triple axis spectrometer, TAIPAN. She is also an adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Wollongong and the national Honorary Secretary of the Australian Institute of Physics. Kirrily is also a partner investigator for the FLEET ARC Centre of Excellence, involved with researching novel materials for low-energy electronic devices. After obtaining her PhD from Monash University in Melbourne in 2004, she spent around eight years living and working in North America (McMaster University, Canada 2004-2005) and Europe (Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Germany 2006-20012) developing her science career and international reputation in neutron scattering.

Kirrily’s main scientific research focuses on understanding dynamics in materials using many of the instruments within the inelastic neutron scattering and spectroscopy suite at ANSTO and at overseas neutron scattering facilities. Rule has a diverse physics background with research in areas such as condensed matter physics, surface physics and thin films, solid-state physics and medical physics. Her main area of research involves understanding the magnetic interactions in novel, low dimensional quantum magnets.

Kirrily is currently a Principal Instrument Scientist at ANSTO and is co-responsible for the thermal-neutron triple axis spectrometer Taipan, and operates the user-program for both Taipan and Sika, the cold-neutron triple axis spectrometer.

Read Kirrily's Abstract

 Low Dimensional Magnetism – How Neutrons Can Reveal Unusual Physics In Reduced Dimensionality: Thin Films, Nanoparticles And More

Vacuum conditions can be critical to many scientific pursuits – from maintaining ultra-clean environments, to ensuring stable operating conditions for delicate samples. Vacuum technology is ubiquitous to research labs and large-scale facilities as it enables scientific discoveries that would otherwise not be possible. For instance, without vacuum technologies, the optical, electronic and spin properties of exfoliated, single-layer graphene could not be measured. Vacuum technologies are also imperative for reaching very low temperatures, close to absolute zero. In fact, the coldest place in the universe is right here on Earth within a dilution refrigerator, in which samples can be maintained at temperatures as low as a fraction of a Kelvin. These environments are extremely useful for the investigation of magnetic materials; quantum magnets, thin films, and nanoparticles, as all thermal motion can be excluded from a sample, isolating purely magnetic properties.

I will focus on some recent neutron scattering measurements of low dimensional magnetic materials where low temperature vacuum environments have revealed some intriguing new information.

Prof. Peggy Zhang

Prof. Peggy Zhang

Research Fellow at School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales

Biography

Dr Peggy Qi Zhang is a research fellow at School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales (UNSW). She received her PhD degree in Materials Science and Engineering in 2015 from UNSW and was awarded Women-in-FLEET Fellowship by ARC Centre of Excellence in Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies (FLEET) in 2019. Her main research interests include ferroelectric topological defects and their transitions, application of scanning probe microscope in Materials Engineering, and development of low-energy nanoscale ferroelectric devices. She has published her outcomes in a wide range of high impact journals, such as Nature communications, Advanced Materials, Advanced Functional materials, Applied Physics Reviews, etc.

Read Peggy's Abstract

Deterministic Switching of Ferroelectric Bubble Nanodomains

Qi Zhang1, Sergei Prokhorenko2, Yousra Nahas2, Lin Xie3, Laurent Bellaiche2, Alexei Gruverman4 and Nagarajan Valanoor11School of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia; 2Physics Department and Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA; 3Department of Physics, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, 518055 China 4Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA

A new type of nanoscale ferroelectric domains, termed as “bubble domains”, has been observed in ultrathin epitaxial PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3/SrTiO3/PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 ferroelectric sandwich structures. It is confirmed that these bubble domains are laterally confined spheroids of sub-10 nm size with local dipoles opposite to the macroscopic polarization of their surrounding ferroelectric matrix via high-resolution piezoresponse force microscopy, and aberration-corrected atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

Here we demonstrate the deterministic and reversible transformation of nanoscale ferroelectric bubbles into cylindrical domains using a scanning probe microscopy approach. The bubble domains can be erased by applying a mechanical force via the scanning probe microscope tip, and on the other hand, application of an electrical pulse with a specific combination of amplitude and duration can recreate the bubble domain state. This combination of mechanical and electrical passes is essential for realization of reversible transformation as application of only electrical pulses results in complete erasure of the bubble domain state. Effective Hamiltonian‐based simulations reproduce phase sequences for both the mechanical and electric passes and confirm the intrinsic nature of these transitions. This simple and effective pathway for switching between various topological defect states may be exploited for emergent devices.

Dr. Jay Hendricks

Dr. Jay Hendricks

Deputy Program Manager, NIST on a Chip

Biography

A world-class expert in low pressure and vacuum metrology, Dr. Hendricks is the Deputy Program Manager for NIST on a Chip (NOAC), an innovative approach that seeks to utilize fundamental physics to develop quantum-based sensors and standards. He is the Scientific Director of IUVSTA (International Union of Vacuum Science, Technique and Application) an organization representing > 15,000 physicists, chemists, materials scientists, engineers, and technologists linked by their common study and use of vacuum Science. Dr. Hendricks received Ph.D. and M.A. and in Physical Chemistry from Johns Hopkins University, and his B.S. in Chemistry from Penn State University. Dr. Hendricks has 30 years of vacuum science and technology experience and has authored over 70 publications. He is a two-time winner of US Department of Commerce Gold Medal, one of which was for an innovative quantum-based pressure standard.

Dr. Hendricks has demonstrated leadership and chairs national and international vacuum standards meetings and symposia. He currently is the Scientific Director of IUVSTA, Chair of IMEKO TC16, and is active with the AVS Recommended Practices Committee, and AVS Publication Committee.

Read Jay's Abstract

NIST on a chip and quantum-based pressure and vacuum measurements

The world of pressure and vacuum measurements and standards is currently undergoing a revolution in both measurement traceability, “the fundamental philosophy behind a measurement chain back to primary units”, and measurement technology, the “how a measurement is made”. This keynote presentation covers a bit of metrology history of how we got to where we are today and gives a forward-looking vision for the future. The role of NIST as a National Metrology institute is described along with an explanation of how and why our world-wide standards changed on May 20th, 2019. The NIST on a Chip program (NOAC) is introduced as a daring and innovative approach which seeks to utilize fundamental physics and laws of nature to develop quantum-based sensors and standards capable of being miniatured to the chip scale. The technical core of the lecture will be a deeper dive into new research on measurement methods for pressure, the Fixed Length Optical Cavity (FLOC) and for vacuum, the Cold Atom Vacuum Standard (CAVS). What is exciting about these new measurement approaches is that they are both primary (relying on fundamental physics), are quantum-based and use photons for the measurement readout which is key for taking advantage of the fast-growing field of photonics. The FLOC will enable the elimination of mercury barometers pressure standards worldwide and the CAVS will be first primary standard for making vacuum measurements below 1.3×10-5 Pa. Finally, I will speak on how science and research are done at a government lab such as NIST and talk about the types of partnership opportunities that NIST can offer for researchers, students, and private companies.

Dr. Ron Clarke

Dr. Ron Clarke

Associate Professor at School of Chemistry, University of Sydney

Biography

Ron Clarke has devoted his research career to the field of biophysical chemistry. After completing his PhD in Physical Chemistry with John Coates in the Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Adelaide, working on the mechanism of cyclodextrin inclusion complex formation, he moved to Germany with an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship to work with Peter Läuger on membrane biophysics, in particular the mechanism of the Na+,K+-pump. This was followed by another 10 years in Europe at, in chronological order, the University of East Anglia (Leverhulme Fellow) in Norwich, the Fritz-Haber-Institute (Liebig, Max Planck and German Research Foundation Fellow) in Berlin, where he experienced German reunification first hand, and the Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics (Max Planck and Scientific Fellow) in Frankfurt. In Germany he completed his Habilitation, qualifying as a physical chemistry lecturer at the Free University Berlin and the University of Frankfurt. In 1999 he took up a lectureship in Physical Chemistry at the University of Sydney. Awards: Dozor Fellowship (University of the Negev, Israel, 2008), McAulay-Hope Prize for Original Biophysics (Australian Society for Biophysics, 2010), Humboldt Fellow (Technical University Berlin, 2014-15), Archibald Olle Prize (Royal Australian Chemical Institute, 2016), Fellow of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (2017).

Prof. Sarah Harmer

Prof. Sarah Harmer

Flinders University

Biography

Prof Harmer received a PhD from the Ian Wark Research Institute, UniSA in 2003. She then accepted a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the University of Western Ontario where her research focused on the surface electronic structure of 3d transition metal sulfide and arsenide fracture surfaces using Synchrotron X-ray photoelectron Spectroscopy (SXPS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). Upon returning to Australia in 2005, Sarah worked in the Manufacturing & Infrastructure Technology division of CSIRO. In 2006 she returned to the Wark as a Research Fellow within the Australian Mineral Science Research Institute (AMSRI). In 2012 she took up an ARC Future Fellowship at Flinders University to study the interaction between bacteria and mineral surfaces using advanced synchrotron nanospectroscopic techniques. In 2019, she founded and is the Director of Flinders Microscopy and Microanalysis. Her current interest is Photoemission Electron Microscopy studies of transition metal sulfides.

Read Sarah's Abstract

Surface Analysis of Transition Metal Sulfides and the Detection of Minority Species

 

Prof Sarah Harmer, Flinders University

Transition metal sulfides play a vital role in a number of geological, environmental and technological areas including ore formation, weathering of minerals, minerals processing, biomineralization, corrosion and catalysis. Understanding the physical and chemical properties of their surfaces, and with the environment and microbes is crucial to mining, the environment and nanotechnology. The study of mineral surfaces using advanced spectroscopic techniques is challenging due to the non-perfect nature of minerals surfaces. Surface analysis techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) have been used to elucidate the surface properties of minerals and their use is now widely accepted by industry. However, there is still questions regarding the accurate interpretation of photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Increased interest in these materials has driven developments in sample preparation and the use of in and ex situ nanospectroscopic techniques. Synchrotron nanospectroscopic techniques including Photoemission electron Microscopy (PEEM) and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) have been used for the study of heterogeneous surfaces, providing quantitative chemical mapping, the detection of minority species and analysis in liquids.